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What non-comics are you reading these days?

#21

I Am Legend is actually really great and much better than any adaptation that’s been made.

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#22

Yeah it’s definitely on the to-read list. Oddly, my library didn’t have it, which is why I’m reading Earthbound at the moment.

#23

I am boarding a plane in a few hours and will be reading Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. It has been years since I read Lecarre and yesterday I realized I never read this one.

#24

Finished A Scanner Darkly on Friday. Tomorrow morning, I will start re-reading Camus’ The Stranger, which I “read” in high school and am finally getting around to reading for the pure joy of it.

Come to think of it, there are many books that I hated having to read in grammar or high school, but which I have gone back to as an adult and thoroughly enjoyed. As it turns out, there is a valid reason why many of those books are considered classics. :wink:

#25

I just finished reading the Advancement by L. Russ Bush. Incredible reminder about the Laws of Thermodynamics and universal, energy conversion systems!

Comic wise - I busted out an oldy but a goody today and reread Spider-Man: Reign (the DKR of Spider-Man). Fantastic read. Really off-kilter & works very well.

#26

Spider-Man: Reign freaked me out a bit when they got to the bit where Mary Jane got cancer from radioactive sperm. Andrews always seems to start well but then throws something like that in as a central bit. I kind of feel the same about Iron Fist: The Living Weapon.

#27

Alan Moore’s Jerusalem is actually coming out next year: http://www.bleedingcool.com/2015/03/18/alan-moores-jerusalem-to-be-published-in-2016-by-knockabout-and-liveright/

Knockabout, the UK publishers of League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen, will be publishing Jerusalem in the UK in the autumn of 2016. In the US and Canada, the book will be published by Liveright Publishing, part of WW Norton.

It looks at the stark ramifications of ideas on love, tragedy and morality in a work of space-time bending historical fiction centred in his hometown of Northampton, England, the destitute half-a-square-mile in which Moore’s family lived for several generations.

It hosts a rich cast of characters from the living, the dead, the celestial and the infernal. Personages as diverse as branded Tennessee slave Henry George or the monstrous Oliver Cromwell rub shoulders with drunks, prostitutes and brawlers, with the composer Sir Malcolm Arnold, with playwright Samuel Beckett or James Joyce’s daughter Lucia, with the saint and martyr Thomas á Becket, John Bunyan, John Clare, Buffalo Bill and a host of derelict ghosts, Biblical demons, family members and neighbourhood legends.

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#28

Great. There’s my reading for an entire year then.

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#29

I gave up on Earthbound yesterday. The writing was fine but the story content, a unfaithful husband falling under the sway of a seductive ghost, wasn’t something I wanted to read about at the moment. So I’ve switched over to The Shrinking Man instead and am enjoying it far more.

#30

I’m reading A Princess of Mars (the first John Carter book) for the first time, and I’m enjoying it. Pulp sci-fi is great.
Hopefully after I’ve finished I can give the film another go. I remember liking it but I hope reading the book will retroactively make the film better. Do you guys ever find that with other books turned into films?

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#31

I loved the first John Carter book. I know I read the second but don’t remember if I also read the third. It seemed to be kind of diminishing returns. The first one is top notch though.

#32

Aaw, that’s sad news. I’ll attempt to read as many of them as I can, but I can see how it could go stale (as with any series).
Did you ever watch the film?

#33

Yes. I liked about the last 1/3 to 1/2. Part of the magic of the book was that you figured everything out with John whereas the film told you everything in the first few minutes. If I remember correctly, the film covered at least the first two books maybe the third book as well. Like I said, I don’t remember where I left off.

#34

Yeah, I never feel completely satisfied with how exposition is handled in films. With a book or comic or whatever you can slow down the pace and read it multiple times to let it sink in. But in a film if you’re not paying attention for this specific minute then you may be lost for the next hour. So maybe they did it at the start since they assume everybody would be paying attention at that point?

Things like this are a big reason on why I generally prefer films that are their own thing, not an adaptation from another medium.

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#35

You’re going to speed-read it? :smile:

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#36

I suppose this might be the best place to post this. Folio Society have a new version of Dune coming out, illustrated by Sam Weber:

Expensive, but gorgeous.

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#37

That is very cool.

#38

I’m really struggling to find something to read that I enjoy. The last couple of books I’ve tried just didn’t enthuse me and I struggled to get through them.

#39

What kind of books do you like? I was a bookseller/barista for 12 years. I may be able to help :wink:

#40

I’m reading that as “Dude”, not “Dune”.

I just finished A Girl With All the Gifts, an apocalyptic horror novel by M.R. Carey, who I found out is actually Lucifer and X-Men writer Mike Carey under a new different pen name. Pretty good stuff.