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What non-comics are you reading these days?

  • I, Robot by Isaac Asimov (1950)
  • The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein (1966)
  • Rip Foster Rides the Grey Planet by Blake Savage (1952)
  • Blast Off at Woomera by Hugh Walters (1957)
  • Galactic Patrol by E.E. ‘Doc’ Smith (1938)

I feel that I, Robot is a cheat because it’s a short story collection, but at least I didn’t select an entire series like Miqque :stuck_out_tongue:

I’m also a bit worried about including the Heinlein book. 1966 feels a bit too modern :wink:

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I can never resist listing things:

  1. The Player of Games – Iain M Banks
  2. Snow Crash – Neal Stephenson
  3. Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card
  4. Hyperion – Dan Simmons
  5. Stand on Zanzibar – John Brunner

As usual, some of these might change depending on my mood and the positions of the stars.

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Ah, the all too ephemeral top 5…

The Chrysalids – John Wyndham (1955)
Of Man and Manta (trilogy) – Piers Anthony (1968/1970/1975)
The Road – Cormac McCarthy (2006)
More Than Human – Theodore Sturgeon (1953)
The Prestige – Christopher Priest (1995)

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I was 16 when I first read the ‘Lensmen’ series, and was an absolute mess when Kimball Kinnison was blinded and lost all his limbs in Gray Lensman. :sob:

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The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress may well be my very favorite novel ever. It’s revolution, it’s a love story, it’s politics, it’s Luna, it’s Wye and Manny and Professor Bernardo de la Paz (who Ian McKellen is just getting old enough to play). And I bloody love Mycroft.

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I still give it a read from time to time. BTW, the series in hardback (from SFBC) is outrageous, as high as $200 a copy (and you need two volumes, or get lost in space), But there is a bright star. Trek over to Kindle and the Chronicles are like 99¢, for the lot.

Rumour has it Heinlein and Doc Smith were going to collaborate on something, but I think that was around the time RAH moved to California for his health.

I’m pretty much old school here:

Fahrenheit 451 – Bradbury
1984 – Orwell
Brave New World – Huxley
Slaughterhouse 5 – Vonnegut
1Q84 – Murakami

To be fair, I recently purchased Dune and Hitchhiker’s Guide, so my list may soon change…

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I’m terrible at lists as I always leave great stuff out and then kick myself later on. But I’d probably have Fahrenheit 451 and Brave New World on there too, and either Slaughterhouse 5 or Timequake by Vonnegut. I’d also have We by Yevgeny Zamyatin and (if I’m allowed) Shelley’s Frankenstein. If I’m not, then probably A Scanner Darkly by Philip K Dick.

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I’m re-reading “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep,” the story that inspired Blade Runner.

Holy fuck is this dark and dreary. Grim-Dark doesn’t have anything on this. Hell, and “likeable characters” don’t even make an appearance in the story.

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Now you see why most of stuff by Dick is “inspired” and not “adapted”.

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  1. Dune
  2. Neuromancer
  3. Spares
  4. Accelerando
  5. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

Three Stigmata is a bit of a placeholder for all of Dick’s novels, really. Snow Crash and The Stars My Destination or Use of Weapons would be next. And I was making things easier for myself by barring The Road (primarily being post-apocalyptic fiction), Hitchhiker’s (primarily being comedic) and purely dystopian novels like 1984 and Brave New World.

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Trinidad Yoruba

Top 5 sci-fi:

  1. Dune
  2. The Year of the Flood
  3. Oryx and Crake
  4. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
  5. The Dispossessed

VALIS is my favorite PKD novel but the sci-fi elements are slight and may be imaginary so I left it out. If I were to merge the two MaddAddam books then A Scanner Darkly or Slaughterhouse-Five would go to #5.

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Grammar, Gesture and Meaning in American Sign Language

Is there a reason you just put titles here, Kalman? A review or reason you’re reading might be a little more helpful unless you’re just this thread as your list function.

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To be fair, that title speaks for itself :smiley:

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It’s a fantastic book but you do need to like grammar. :wink:

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I started in “Food for the Heart: the Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah.” It’s off to a great start. Ajahn Chah was a monk who was influential in the Thai Forest Tradition, an austere lineage in Buddhist monasticism. It’s wonderful pithy teaching with a good feel for the practicality of daily life.

Ya. It screams really fucking boring. :wink:

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Not if you like languages. :wink:

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