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Us Discussion Thread (SPOILERS)

Saw US yesterday. I’m probably going to be in the minority here, but I liked it better than Get Out.

Get Out was much tighter in terms of theme, but I think it kind of lost itself in its own message in places. US had its theme take a backseat to the cinematic experience, and for me, that works. That decision by Peele not to continually remind the audience what the movie is trying to say leaves a little more room for ambiguity and interpretation. If Get Out was Peele on race, US is Peele on class warfare.

It had its issues. There were some plot holes, but they weren’t distracting. The attention to detail is pretty impressive. There aren’t many lines from the first half that don’t pay off in the second somehow.

Still digesting this. Great movie.

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22 posts were merged into an existing topic: What are you watching? 2019 edition

I saw ‘Us’.

It’s a real crowdpleaser. The cinema was full (7:30pm Friday night) and there was a lot of reaction.

My take is that Peele is a better director than he is a writer. This is very well made but the story itself falls between two posts, for me.

It’s not as intense as ‘Get Out’ and Peele has moved away from any overt political message as well. It’s not the set-piece heavy, never lets up, rollercoaster that something like ‘IT’ is either. I also think it twists a bit too much for it’s own good.

I don’t want to say too much or even spoiler-text it a lot. It’s the first weekend.

My opinion is that Peele could use a co-writer or even a writer he directs, but that I’ll always turn out for a film he makes.

He has real talent and skill.

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I too saw “Us” today. I agree with a lot of Steve’s assessment; this is a expertly crafted movie that didn’t live up to the expectations of “Get Out.” Perhaps if I had gone in expecting to be more of a straight horror film I’d have liked it a bit more.

The only thing I might disagree with Steve on is the political message—I thought it was there, though not as strong as in Get Out.

Also Tim Heidecker is always welcome in any film, imo.

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It’s there but diffused far more than ‘Get Out’.

I repeat (and elaborate) what I said; I’d like Peele to get a co-writer who will argue with him, the way successful novelists need a strong editor.

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I liked Us quite a lot. There was a moment where I switched from thinking that it was worse than Get Out to better, and I appreciate this for being a more ambitious movie. I guess that I’m still working on working out the meaning though. I really liked a lot of the cinematography. The audience kept laughing at inappropriate moments, which was a buzzkill.

I’ll have to disagree here. There seemed to be a mass exodus as about thirty people left a minute before the film finished. It was in its final moments but they were just putting their coats on and going.

Well, it is the north of England I suppose. The last ten to fifteen minutes got some big laughs. Killed that sequence for me stone dead.

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Just got out of “Us”.

Get Out was a lot better. In a lot of ways. It’s just a better structured story.

“Us” is entirely focused on its premise, and that’s not all bad. It wrings a lot from it. In fact, that’s the best thing about the movie - how it uses every gag, set-piece, and action scene from that basic idea and plays it for all its worth. It shines in that way, despite not really having much of a core driving narrative. The actors and the way the movie plays around with them and their reactions are all gold.

But it’s messy, and forces way too many beats rather than growing organically. And it ultimately marred the movie for me. The last act does a lot that adds nothing to the movie, and actively detracts from it and makes a lot of what came before…feel kinda lame. Like, it’s not only that it adds nothing, but it exaggerates in it in such a way - but not really changing anything at all. At best the final act feels like Peele wanted to leave the audience with a lasting impression, at worst it feels like a very cheap and limp attempt at being shocking and creepy…and failing miserably.

6-7/10

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Saw US yesterday. I’m probably going to be in the minority here, but I liked it better than Get Out.

Get Out was much tighter in terms of theme, but I think it kind of lost itself in its own message in places. US had its theme take a backseat to the cinematic experience, and for me, that works. That decision by Peele not to continually remind the audience what the movie is trying to say leaves a little more room for ambiguity and interpretation. If Get Out was Peele on race, US is Peele on class warfare.

It had its issues. There were some plot holes, but they weren’t distracting. The attention to detail is pretty impressive. There aren’t many lines from the first half that don’t pay off in the second somehow.

Still digesting this. Great movie.

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Peele has been pretty clear on this:

Also obviously a dig at directors, like Ari Aster, who say their movies aren’t horror.

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I dunno.
I feel like the message was very prevalent in Get Out, but it didn’t really do much to overbear the story or how it was telling itself.
With “Us” the themes just goes all over the place. Which would be fine if it focused on the symbolic or magical realism of the situation…but it tries really hard to justify some plot beats and it makes the movie boring and less interesting as a result.
Like, it might not be the plot holes that were distracting…but these attempts definitely were.

After a night to think about it, there’s definitely stuff in this movie I love…but so much just bugs me at how jarring and clumsily used aspects of it were. Like, it’s a simpler horror story - until it’s not. And the contrast doesn’t transition well during those moments.

In the end, I will admit that I enjoyed bits of “Us” more than I enjoyed singular parts of Get Out.
But it just doesn’t have a cohesive tie whether its in the tone, or the story, or themes.

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‘Us’ feels like Peele had too much he wanted to do for a 2 hour movie. So it keeps changing as it goes along, becoming different kinds of horror film.

I think it’ll do well and not take a nose dive next week, but I’ll be interested in the word of mouth on it?

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For the past week or so a lot of critics/influencers I’ve followed have all been saying some variation of “It’s great but

So, seems good.
I’ve only seen one post-release review from a mutual follower that said “It had okay moments but meh

Yeah I saw that tweet but saw it as a dig at directors who are embarrassed about making horror films.

Obviously Get Out is a horror film and this is too. I guess for me the difference is that Get Out felt like a 70s horror film and this one felt like a 00s horror film. I like both but prefer 70s.

That said I did like this film and look forward to seeing it again at some point. The twist was fairly predictable (I had pegged it as a possibility very early on), but with all of the ramifications of what the climax laid out, I bet the film’s first half is fun to revisit.

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I feel like the first half will be aggravating to revisit with that in mind.
Although fun to revisit in the sense that it was fun to begin with.

Although I was spoiled on the twist beforehand, but when watching it saw absolutely nothing that really led up to it (outside of the obvious cut in the flashback) so by the time it was revealed I had started to believe that it was just bullshit. Didn’t make it any more effective though.

I noticed some stuff throughout like her remark to the other mother that she struggles with talking. Also the guttural sounds she made during some of the kills. I just don’t know if she’d repressed her memories (and only remembered when it was shown to the audience) or if it was at the forefront of her mind all along. I’m pretty interested in looking for more clues on a rewatch though.

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I noticed all that too.
But…it’s nothing that really affects anything. Like nothing about the twist that makes a scene or set-piece more interesting or enlightening. Or clever. Which is why I didn’t bring them up.
It doesn’t even really change the thrust of the story or the reasons they acted the way they did.

So stuff like that started feeling circumstantial, or charitably…red herring.
A twist has to actually affect a movie outside of supposed ramifications of the base story. It has to affect the plot, the themes, and the development of the story. In hindsight. But it has to mean something every step of the way. It can’t exist in a vacuum with ‘hints’. And that’s how this came off as.

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Yes, and it was a very savvy move on his part. After all the acclaim and winning the Best Screenplay Oscar, the temptation must have been there to again try to summarize the State of Race Relations in America once more. That could have gone terribly wrong and ended up hackneyed and corny.

Instead he offered a movie that contains some big themes (like most great horror films) but is more focused on the kills and suspense. His future as a genre filmmaker remains very bright.

The more I sit with it the more I like it, but I wish I had seen it the first time with adjusted expectations.

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Re: Us

If the Tethered mimic the humans they’re cloned from, then wouldn’t the Tethered Adelaide be doing what Red/the real Adelaide wanted her to do? That’s what the ballet scene was meant to show: Red was the one with the actual talent for dancing. So she could have induced memory loss in her counterpart as she built toward her revenge. Clone Adelaide didn’t seem to know what Red was even when they were alone. Though the link between them was severed at some point before the movie starts. I can’t remember, but I think it may have happened during the ballet sequence.

I liked Us, but I think it suffered in not being nearly as atmospheric as Get Out. Probably a bit too many action sequences, and tbh there was a little too much humor. I think Get Out struck the right balance with both.

I’m still a bit confused by the ending, but I’m not sure if that’s down to me missing things or the central metaphor being confused. I also didn’t know what Hands Across America was (aside from having heard the name before). I looked it up on my phone after the movie and am still a little baffled. I guess it was a pretty empty stunt, so maybe Red’s rebellion is meant to be just as empty since she had no love for the Tethered and was just using them to reclaim her higher “class” position.

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There’s no real answer to your first spoiler chunk.
Both contradict each other and how the divide works never really makes sense.
And in light of what the movie reveals, then starts making less sense.

Because even if there was induced memory loss…which I don’t even know how that would happen it wouldn’t really have helped the other one in any way. Especially during the first “meeting” sequence with the fairy tale analogy rant.

In fact, nothing about what either does with regards to being alone with each other or simply alone makes sense when you factor the twist, within or without.

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I don’t think it makes any sense to look for an explanation to the mechanism, but it’s probably worth learning more about what Peele was intending?

Then deciding, as individuals (ironically) if it worked or not?

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