millarworld.tv Comics Creators

Understanding and writing Diverse voices

I’m currently working on a project where the majority of the cast are not white middle class males like myself , and have been looking at ways to sense check the voices of these characters and respect their cultural, spiritual and gender identities.

I am fortunate enough to have grown up in a multicultural community and many of the characters are based on the lives and experiences of friends and family.

I am not however, naive enough to think “I got this” and have been working with an editor/ expert (can’t tell you what in:wink: ) who can guide me should I stray from an honest voice.

I found this podcast quite useful and reaffirming that I’m on the right path but not yet perfect

I was wondering what others out there look at when trying to write characters or other cultures and gender identities other than their own?

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Whatever you do, steer clear of stereotypes. They’re awful and they make awful reading material. I mean, the phrases and inflections. Seems obvious, but comics seem particularly prone to using them. I’d actually suggest that it’s the culture more than the voice that’s important.

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I agree. Idiomatic turns of phrases are something I see a lot of in comics/entertainment.
But I have gone/lived in pretty diverse crowds and that stuff doesn’t happen in groups much.
Especially with first generation immigrants that stuff I saw mostly when they’re with their cultural peers or elders.

So when you have a minority character start spitting out cultural idioms in a random group - that’s irked me a bit.

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I have used Youtube to find videos to give me examples of voice and language for cultures outside of my experience, especially for pronunciation.

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@Hank @Tom_Punk @Tony_Laplume
Thanks for the feedback guys.
Agree with all your points. My major pet peeve in comic books is Captain Boomerang (And that’s coming from a New Zealander!)
Tom Taylor must want to blow his brains out when he reads suicide squad. No one in australia talks like that!

Apparently Marvel’s America is a textbook example of what not to do.

I’ve heard the same.
Although I haven’t read it so can’t really comment.
As I understood the writer has imilar background and gender identity to America herself and was a first time comics writer (again that’s what I recall could be wrong)

If this is the case then that’s just poor editing on Marvels part

Or poor editorial direction. Or just a bad writer.

Yes.
And it was awful. One of the most inadvertently racist things I’ve read.
It’d make 80’s minority characters blush.

Makes 80’s Vibe look like Malcolm X.

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Bozhe moy! I cannae believe ye’re havin’ difficulty wi’ this. Listen, cherie: simply absorb every line of dialogue written by Chris Claremont. That’s all y’all need, sugah.

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Hey! Thanks to Chris Claremont, I was the only one in the cinema to understand the last line at the end of the first Blade movie!
Dosvidanya Tovarisch!

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When I was a kid watching the cartoon, everything about it was perfect. But it’s really hard to watch now. Cartoonish in all the wrong ways!

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Write what you know.
Don’t write what you don’t know.

Even Mark Twain sounds snarky these days.

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I don’t know if a 6 issue series of me throwing shade at @mattgarvey1981 would have that bigger audience?

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Well, hell. I’d read it!

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You mean this Vibe?

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Yes indeed.
She also made Extrano look cool and Bunker into Harvey Milk.

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That was in the Dark Times; before The Flash; before Carlos Valdes.

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“Curse your dopeness Vibe”

What
the
actual
F*@k

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Vibe is one cool mofo. :wink: