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This is where you talk about Fight Club.


#121

Absolutely. I am sure Bickle counts amongst the inspirations for Rorschach.

But then, Rorschach is also cool.


#122

Guilty.


#123

I think the biggest Bickle/Durden difference for me is that Bickle’s actions are as if he’s defending himself against the world and how it’s treated him, whereas Durden has pro-actively gripped the world by the balls and evolved past caring what it thinks of him altogether.

For me, that was always the draw in how cool I found the character.


#124

I still don’t understand why that bit is quoted as much as it is.
I’m not sure that I got it?


#125

You talking to me?


#126

Because it’s terrifying. He’s delusional in practising his lines for a future conflict.

Terrifying and sad.


#127

What the characters of Bickle, Narrator/ Durden had In common, was they were rejected by society (or let down by it) and in turn rejected it. Both driven insane by what we call living in the modern world. And I’ve always asked myself, in the context of that movie, was Bickle actions actually insane, or was his reactions to that world of crime and perversion super sane?


#128

Yeah, Bickle definitely played a part in inspiring Moore’s Rorschach (whereas the other 70s vigilante Paul Kersey, Charles Bronson character in Death wish, was also a straight up influence for The Punisher).

Taxi Driver was also an influence on Frank Miller too. When Bruce first goes out as a vigilante before donning the costume in Batman: Year One - that’s all Bickle (even down to his choice in jacket).

As an aside, I saw a 4K, 7.1 surround sound screening of Taxi Driver recently - the technical upgrades certainly enhanced the Michael Chapman cinematography and the Hermann soundtrack. All made it an absolutely glorious viewing.


#129

That sounds awesome. I’ve never seen Taxi Driver on the big screen, that’s really something I should rectify as soon as I get the chance.


#130

Yeah, I had that idea too when Travis Bickle started to exercise. He is Batman.


#131

I think it ties into the feeling of dread people get living in urban environments whenever there’s a problem. If you’ve ever been mugged, or hassled in the street, or assaulted or whatever, you replay that event in your head over and over again. You think about what you’d do if you ever saw them again. Bickle is preparing for that next time, practising his lines and the quick-draw on his gun.

It’s not a pretty scene, and it’s a sign of Bickle’s increasing paranoia and derangement. But think about it - we all know somebody or have communicated online with somebody who had a gun for personal defence and talks about how they’d be willing to use it if somebody tried to jump them in the street. It plays exactly to that mindset.


#132

No. By his crazy logic , sure he was. But a sane individual does not mow down a bunch of people just because he doesn’t like them. Also his first choice of victim was a governor. In the end he just wanted to kill someone. The irony is that because he “bungled the hit” on Palantine, he became a hero in the eyes of the public.


#133

I read that as “bungled the hit on Palpatine”. I’ve never seen Taxi Driver and starting to wonder if it was very different from what I imagined.


#134

Um, watch it now.


#135

Concur. Laura and I only watched it a couple of years ago, and we both loved it.


#136

There’s no particular reason why I’ve never seen it. It isn’t that I was making a concerted effort not to see it. I just haven’t got around to it. I like Scorcese. Particularly everything up to Goodfellas.

Can I take that Travis Bickle doesn’t try to kill Emperor Palpatine, because making him a disgruntled, unstable taxi driver on the mean streets of Coruscant would be awesome?

Edit: If that print that Sanjay mentions upthread was to hit Dublin, I would be there like a shot.


#137

The tone and mood is so great. Deniro’s performance is worth all the accolades you can muster (and all the other players - who can only count as supporting roles - are brilliant - Sybil, Harvey Keitel, Jody Foster, the old guy from Everybody Loves Raymond (never watched the show, but that’s all I know him from), cameo by Scorsese).

I wasn’t there (or even born) but people say it perfectly captures NYC of the era, and it’s a really grimy, gritty, cheap film (in a good way). They didn’t have the money for permits to film many of the street scenes so they did them on the sly; these are real streets, real people.

There’s one particular scene where Travis is on the phone, and the decision made there blew me away when I first saw it - maybe it’s nothing, but that scene is almost always what I first think of when I think of the film.


#138

Peter Boyle maybe? He had a weird career. He could be a scary dude in something like The Friends of Eddie Coyle or he could be hilarious in Young Frankenstein. He’s hard to pigeonhole.

I will find a copy of it over the next couple of days and add my comments in the What are you Watching thread?


#139

That’s him.

But, yeah - this isn’t where you talk about Taxi Driver.


#140

I still need to rewatch Fight Club with all of these new insights. It is a bit of a First World Problem I admit.