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The Wild Storm by Warren Ellis (Spoilers)


#342

Yeah, I understand - but to rebut:

It’s a cool name. No half measures.


#343

Forrest Gump!

Bridget Jones!

Jack Reacher!

:smile:


#344

Ripslashbloodclawmaimblade miniseries or GTFO


#345

You laugh but that sounds like the coolest thing ever :wink:


#346

Ripslashbloodclawmaimblade is an actual Wildstorm character!


#347

Let’s lobby DC, STAT.


#348

I mean, I’ll take a mniseries of his team, the Homeland Security Squadron:

That’s Ripslashbloodclawmaimblade at the front.


#349

I gotta say, I’ve read fleeting Wildstorm here and there years back (and obviously stuff like Deathblow and Grifter left the biggest impression) - but damn can’t deny it got style.

I guess that’s why I gotta hold out hope a series just titled “Michael Cray” is prologue to that style again.


#350

To be fair, Ripslashbloodclawmaimblade was a parody of characters like Warblade (and Ripclaw from Cyberforce) who had no personality beyond Wolverine with the serial numbers filed off.

I think the early Wildstorm stuff was lighting in a bottle - I started rereading WildCATs and while I could appreciate a lot of the style over substance in the pre-Alan Moore work, as soon as he left the book became nigh-unreadable until the relaunch under Lobdell and Charest/D’Anda/Friend (and really, when Joe Casey and Sean Phillips took over).

You could do a crazy balls-out action book and bring back the name of Deathblow, but without the exact right creative team firing on all cylinders, it’ll fall apart quickly. And it wouldn’t fit with what Ellis has established thus far for the relaunch.


#351

Yeah, of course.
That’s why I’m just waiting to see what happens. A big undercurrent right now is that there is all of this craziness under the surface that is itching to burst through.

When the 24 issues are over, I wonder if it will end up in a place where Deathblow can be unashamed of that name.

Totally agreed about the right creative teams as well.


#352

I’m certainly not hating on old skool Wildstorm. I love all that stuff. It’s much more my thing than the grounded approach they’re taking now (even if I’m very much enjoying that for its craft).

But I also respect the idea that they’re trying for an aesthetic and an approach. Feels like a Skunkwords for a TV series, this whole thing. In fact, it’d be a very dope one.


#353

And I’m not hating on the newer grounded version either.
I’m rather enjoying how it’s weaving this world and I am looking forward to seeing whether Cray is a stylin’ happenin’ book all on its own.

But…gotta say I was really enthused when Grifter let loose recently.
So good


#354

A shame we never got more than one issue of Morrison’s WildCATS. Even w/o Lee, I’d have liked to have the rest.


#355

Apparently the script for #2 is going to be included in the Wildstorm: A Celebration Of 25 Years book that is due out in August.


#356

I do wonder what that will look like, knowing the way Morrison scripts.


#357

Yeah, to be honest, back then I mostly ignored Wildstorm (and most Image stuff) until they got Moore on Wildcats and Ellis on Stormwatch.


#358

James Robinson, John Arcudi and Chuck Dixon did some enjoyable stuff too (pre- Moore/ Ellis).


#359

Wildstorm will always be the house that Ellis built, to me. The direction the line took was so heavily influenced by him; remember that he was there from early on, with DV8, but Stormwatch evolving into Authority and Planetary…that really defined the whole approach. It went from hodgepodge of Marvel and DC homages with a 90s scifi flare to a paranoaic social scifi experiment.

His transformation then allowed a bunch of brilliant creators like Brubaker, Ennis and the Chief to take it forward.

He’s done most of his best work there, I think (Stormwatch, Planetary, Desolation Jones), so he both defined it and it defined him.


#360

Finally got round to reading #4 & 5. Really starting to enjoy this book. I like how the new world is more nuanced than it was previously. Bendix, for example, is an unrepentant racist bastard, but he’s quite entertaining at the same time. Davis-Hunt continues to be more functional than exciting, but is helped tremendously by the energy of the colours. I like this book, and already worry that 24 issues isn’t going to be anything like enough.


#361

#6 has been out and it’s picking up. I like the action scene that opens the issue. The minimalist artwork makes the brutality seem more intense.