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Submission Etiquette


#1

Long story short, spinning out of the rejection of this past Millarworld annual I have commissioned several artists to prepare demo pages for several series that I plan to pitch to comic publishers within the next several months.

My question is, is there a certain etiquette that goes with this? I was told that pitches may end up sitting in a stack for months (or years) so would it be considered a breach of etiquette to pitch the same series to multiple publishers?

Thanks!


#2

I’d pitch to a few, fella.
But if i’m honest, i’d concentrate on one series at a time and have more than just a few pages done.
Say a publisher comes back and say they wanna see more…your are gonna have to wait for the artist, letterer and colourist to work their magic…how long is that gonna take…a month?!
if you get a YES…you wanna be able to be ahead of the curve.

I submitted TRANSFER to a few publishers…most i didn’t hear back from (which you wont)…or at least not yet…seven months later…
One did like it and asked how many issues i had ready…at that time i only had the one…so they passed…

Make the comics because you wanna make them and get them out there.
Have getting it picked up by a publisher as a goal, but not the only goal.

Look at Ryan Ferrier for example, he just went out and made his series D4VE, with MillarWorlder Valentine…i think they get two issues out there…THEN it was picked up by IDW…

Plus, you weren’t rejected…your story just wasn’t picked…this time…like the rest of us.
There is a world of difference. :wink:


#3

Yes, that would be a breach of etiquette.

Your pitches are probably going to sit in a pile for months after months. So, what do you do? Well, firstly make sure you’re submitting to the right company. Take a look at their output and think about who is most likely to pick it up.

Then. while you’re waiting, write up other projects.

Submit them, and so on.

If a publisher rejects you, submit somewhere else, but only after they’ve rejected you.


#4

Well, in my case, I like to send the Project and few pages to a publisher, and then start a NEW PROJECT and send it to a new publisher.
I have read the two replies, and I see their point, but I think that people have taxes to pay or personal ambitions and they have to get money for that. So, I think it’s totally fine to have multiple ways open to have more possibilities to be chosen.
But that is only my opinion, and I live in Spain, so this might not work in another countries.


#5

Yep, that’s pretty much the point I was making.

The original poster was asking about sending the same project to multiple publishers at the same time, which you shouldn’t do. Because if it gets picked up by one publisher and another decides to pick it up, then you’re going to have to admit that you sent it to someone else too, and they’ll feel like you’ve been jerking them around.

And if a publisher decides you’ve behaved in an unprofessional manner, well, they aren’t going to be too keen to look at any more pitches you might send them in the future.

Best to submit to one publisher and then go work on something new.

Then, if that original publisher rejects that first pitch, then you can send it elsewhere.


#6

Thanks all, it is a matter of having limited finances and trying to get more capital for more projects. And for some publishers they say they will only respond if they want the project, so obviously I may never hear back from them…If nothing else I may end up taking the Garvey route, in which case be prepared for an onslaught of DM’s @mattgarvey1981!


#7

anytime, fella.
Always happy to help