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Oscars and Other Movie Awards


#203

After seeing Borat, I think Sacha Baron Cohen is an incredible liar.


#204

In what sense?

Go on, you know you want to…I’ll feed the bear.


#205

Does showing a clip as if it’s filmed off a TV get around the media rights issue? There seems to be a lot of this even when coming form official channels.


#206

Casual answer: No.

If you’re really interested, I’ll ask my l’il sis - her day job for decades has been precisely in obtaining permissions and cutting deals. Basically, anything shown has some fiduciary connection somewhere. “Public Domain” is pretty much a myth. Most get away with it because the money is very little and dwindles over time. The ‘perps’ typically have little or no money, so why sue? And, with most clips, it’s “free” advertising. The latter is why you see screen captures; the owner is much less likely to lawyer up if there’s an audience seeing some advertising (which can be as little as the title of the show).

Entertainment law is complicated!


#207

Not movies but music (although I think it has wider relevance, particularly to the Oscars):

A laudable sentiment - the danger, of course, is that it leads to accusations that acts are no longer recognised on merit but instead to meet quotas in order to be representative. It will be interesting to see how this is implemented.


#208

Well he does suggest that they make the voting members be at least 15% BAME which reflects the actual population. Which sounds pretty reasonable.

I don’t know where the majority of the members come from, I’d presume on the business side because it would be very easy to have at least that if you appointed performers. 35% of the named performers on the night were BAME, none of the winners.

I think that’s the largest part of it as with the Oscars, if you have generally old white men voting they’ll tend to like things aimed more at them and their experiences .


#209

#210

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have announced the 20 contenders for the Best Visual Effects Award for the 89th Academy Awards:

ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS
ARRIVAL
THE BFG
BATMAN V SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE
CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR
DEADPOOL
DEEPWATER HORIZON
DOCTOR STRANGE
FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE
THE JUNGLE BOOK
KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS
MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN
PASSENGERS
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY
STAR TREK BEYOND
SUICIDE SQUAD
SULLY
WARCRAFT
X-MEN: APOCALYPSE

The nominations will be announced on Tuesday, January 24, 2017.
http://www.artofvfx.com/oscars-2017-the-20-contenders-for-the-best-vfx/

As interesting as ‘The Arrival’ was, it’s VFX were hit and miss. ‘Sully’ is a performance movie, ‘Warcraft’ was impressive but overly stylized (hard work, but not as realistic looking, sometimes that puts people off), the rest were mostly business as usual for VFX.

The exception, for me, was ‘Jungle Book’. It’s world was incredibly realistic, despite being shot largely in a car park, and the animals were as believable as the apes from the ‘Planet of the Apes’ films, but a much wider variety.


#211

Yeah before I got down to your comment Steve, my thought too was that Jungle Book would get my vote if I had one. (Having not seen Star Wars or Passengers, obviously).


#212

I thought the effects in Arrival were all hit, no miss. All of its imagery was stunning.


#213

Kubo!


#214

I thought the film was interesting, as I said, but for example, the floating CGI hair, when Amy Adams goes into the Heptapod meeting room, didn’t work properly.

Something like that has to work properly when it’s being judged by other people who create such things for a living.

Last year the Oscar went to ‘Ex Machina’, another relatively small film, but it’s VFX were as close to flawless as it gets.

Maybe for best animated movie?


#215

I’ve never seen an animated movie nominated for best visual effects before though. Is that due to it being stop motion?

Out of the big movies, I’d put BvS a cut above Civil War, Suicide Squad etc. I haven’t seen Jungle Book, and yeah Arrival did have a couple of momemts that weren’t perfect. It doesn’t lessen the overall movie, but the effects are low down my list of things to praise (cinematography, direction, score, Amy Adams).


#216

It’s a conversation that’s been going on for years. Animated films have an effects department, creating water, fire, weather etc., but it’s usually felt that, with animation, the whole film is one big effects sequence.


#217

I’ve heard the conversation in the other direction too (I think that the first time I remember the argument being made was about Attack Of The Clones) - that a lot of big effects movies are so reliant on artificial imagery that they could qualify for best animated feature.


#218

Go ahead. Call a graphics artist an animator or an animator a graphics artist.

You will see such a slap-fight!


#219

I’m not sure ‘Attack of the Clones’ would qualify as best anything.


#220

I remember being pretty amazed when I learned that not one of the Clone Troopers in AOTC was a real actor in costume - they were all ‘virtual actors’. Maybe things have moved in a bit since then, but for its time it was impressive effects work.

Good enough for it to be nominated for Best Visual Effects at that year’s Oscars, anyway. :wink:


#221

‘Lord of the Rings - the Two Towers’, got it that year.

And ‘Spirited Away’ was best animated feature.

In all seriousness, I don’t think any ‘Star Wars’ film has had bad VFX on release (not counting some of things in the re-releases) and they have been an engine to drive the development of a lot of the technology we use today.

‘Rogue One’ stands a perfectly good chance this year, but I still think (right now) that ‘Jungle Book’ was more innovative.


#222

Yeah, The Phantom Menace lost to The Matrix, didn’t it?
Did Revenge of the Sith not win? Don’t tell me it was a Return of the King casualty?