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Need some Art Advice/ Portfolio Review


#1

Hello everyone, I need some art advice.

So my goal is to work in comics full-time (I really, Really hate my day job :frowning: )
I Got my first gig around 2013 and then started to draw for Aspen in 2015. Great news right? Well, Aspen is great but they’re very small and don’t have work available all the time, sometimes I need to wait for months and the pay is super low. So I’ve tried to work with other Publishers in between time (IDW, Dark Horse, DC, Marvel etc) but no response. So I wanted to know If my art is that bad? Do I need to work on certain things that I’m just not seeing? Is this happening to anyone else? Or just me?

Any feed back will be appreciated.

Here’s a link to my work: https://www.artstation.com/angeltovar


#2

The work looks great to me. Better than I see on a lot of comics.

Have you tried more variety of style? The samples look very much what Aspen like, that kind of Michael Turner, J Scott Campbell approach but you don’t see much of it at Dark Horse for example.

How have you been able to pitch with the publishers. I know we’ve had a few artists hit the big time that use to post on this board and their stories tend to be about getting work after sharing portfolios at conventions rather than postal application.


#3

Thanks for the reply Garjones, I think I need to change my style up a bit more. I really like Stuart Immonen and Olivier Coipel. As for cons now and days, they say “Email Us” now. Con’s have changed from what it use to be back in the day. Even at Comic-Con has changed. You use to be able to get portfolio reviews but now its email only. Thanks again!


#4

It’s not my experience but something I have heard second hand, quite recently. The smaller the convention the more relaxed it is and easier to get access to editors. Maybe something worth researching.


#5

dude,

Nothing wrong with your art at all. You have a very dynamic style that i really enjoy.
You have great energy…

The one thing i would say is you need more sequential in your portfolio, out of the 20 images on your side…only 4 are sequential. the rest are covers and pin ups, which are great, dont get me wrong are beautiful, but editors needs to see you can tell a story from page to page…
I saw a interview with Joe Quesada who said that a portfolio show be no more than 12 pages.
9 pages of sseqentials and no more than three covers.
Within those 9 pages you need to cover your bases “across” companies because if you have a portfolio review with Marvel, they dont juts wanna see DC sames, so he said.
Out of those 9 pages tell 3 different 3 pages stories.
Do a 3 page team book, so if you did an x men one, the next should be a DC property say Batman skulking around roof tops on his own. that will show you can do action in the first and tell a quiet story, then for the third 3 pages have a 3 pages story of people doing everyday day things like having a chat.
They want to see you can take a mundane situation and make it look visually interesting.

Also, i’d go obscure with your character choices in your stories.
If you were an editor and you were spending a two day con going through portfolios and doing reviews…
How many X men or Batman samples do you think they see in a day?
i’d say hundreds…
Your job is to stand out, so do some research and go for obscure choices like Power Pack instead of X Men.
The Creeper instead of Bat man, because…say after the review an editor tells you to keep in touch…he is going to remember you more because you stood out.

“Hi, Mr Editor, Hopefully you remember me, you have me your card at XXXX and told me to send you more samples, i was the guy that did the Creeper Pages”
Will stand out more than…
“Hi, Mr Editor, Hopefully you remember me, you have me your card at XXXX and told me to send you more samples, i was the guy that did the Batman Pages”

Also, only show your best pages and don’t hide your weaknesses…editors are blood hounds…if you can’t draw feet and you keep hiding them behind rocks and cars, they’ll spot that instantly! :wink:

Hopefully that helps, buddy?


#6

apologises, i juts found this section in your portfolio:
https://www.artstation.com/artwork/EWOD0

That yes, is for seqentials…but i only found it on the 3rd look at your site.
Seqentials should be at the top in plain site :wink:


#7

I agree with Matt - as his future editor. (Plain “sight”, Matthew!)


#8

I’ll meet you at marvel…


#9

And I’ll ghost write for you as you don’t read enough Marvel.


#10

I think you’re going to have to rethink your approach to the industry. Start hitting up writers, find writers doing books you like and send them art directly. Look for opportunities to work with writers in any venue they’re putting work - every writer I’ve ever known, as well as writing for larger publishers is always pitching, involved with small publishers and trying to place new projects at new publishers.

The more writers you work with the wider your connections and opportunities grow - writers are constantly pitching work, if they’ve worked with you on something short, if they know your name and your availability it can help enormously. (In my experience too, usually a writer will end up being an artists route in to mainstream success)

I think too, and this is much harder (and may speak to my background as a 2000ad artist) but you need to find your individual voice or at least try and break away from slightly generic superhero work you’re doing. It IS lovely, but it also feels like any editor worth their salt can easily find twenty people who can do that work, so you need to really stand out either being Stuart immomen level good (and only Stuart immomen is that good) or by being highly stylistic and stand out (James harren, for example) Personally i’d Look at the possible advantages of working for aspen: not paying that much? Fine, let me be more experimental. Not getting a massive audience? Opportunity to realy try out some weird shit in the art and see what sticks.

(*I stand to be very wrong in that previous paragraph, because I’m a 2000ad artists where slightly quirkier indivualistic art style tends to be preferred over US style superheroics, but I do think the US market is so heavily saturated with decent artists you really have to come at it with more than just “hey this guy is decent” to stand a chance)


#11

Matt, I think you hit the nail on the head. That 9 Page sequential idea is a great idea. Thank you very much! :+1:


#12

I think you’re absolutely right PJ, I need to change up my style. I’ve heard from many people that i’t looks a bit generic or Vanilla. Thanks PJ :hugs:


#13

Huh…I read marvel