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Marvel Movies & TV General Discussion


#7771

#7772

I loved Shang-Chi. I’ve struggled to find parts i missed and never found every issue even in scans, I wonder if it’s available through Marvel digitally.


#7773

So, they can finally say he’s the son of Fu Manchu?


#7774

Doesn’t sound like it…

In the comics, Shang-Chi is the son of China-based globalist who raised and educated his progeny in his reclusive China compound, closed off to the outside world. The son trained in the martial arts and developed unsurpassed skills. He is eventually introduced to the outside world to do his father’s bidding, and then has to come to grips with the fact his revered father might not be the humanitarian he has claimed to be and is closer to what others call him: The Devil’s Doctor. He also might be centuries old. The deceit makes them bitter enemies.


#7775

Fu Manchu with the serial numbers filed off.


#7776

Never understood why Doug Moench didn’t just make Yellow Claw his father.


#7777

I’m not sure I get how Shcang Chi can be a film franchise. He’s a boring character with a boring power. In an age with aliens and rocket men and thunder gods how can essentially a guy who’s good a Kung Fu compete? How’s this not just another kung fu movie like we’ve seen countless times before?

Ant Man is the worst Marvel movie and he can shrink and turn into a giant! Dr Strange is a bit shit and he can do magic and bend reality! This feels like pandering, there’s no other reason why he makes for a good cinematic subject. If you want street level there’s like 20 characters more interesting than him.


#7778

Maybe they should make him an alien, rocket man, thunder god who can shrink, turn giant and do magic and kung-fu. :wink:

It’ll depend on the story for me but I’ve never been really interested in Shang-Chi. He’s a pretty obvious Bruce Lee knock off to capitalize on what was popular at the time of his creation.


#7779

You could say pretty much the same thing about the Black Widow movie, and that’s still happening.


#7780

She doesn’t have spider powers? :wink:


#7781

As a fan of action and martial arts movies, I think that I can get very excited for this. It just needs to be authentic. If the action looks the same as every other Marvel movie then they will have failed.

I see your point about the potential problems of trying to scale him up, but there was a reason that Hawkeye sat out Infinity War. Honestly, just introduce him taking Bucky down in three to five strikes and you’ve shown the audience what he can do.

Hollywood haven’t backed an Asian star since what? Enter the Dragon? It might be nice to finally start a course-correction.


#7782

I wonder if Finn Jones is free for this.


#7783

Imagine if they balls this up like Iron Fist! God, don’t do that to me.


#7784

That’s a different genre. That’s a spy action genre, James Bond type of movie and there’s an audience for that already. There is no kung fu audience. The three biggest martial arts movies were the Rush Hour ones from 20 years ago. And Karate Kid. There is not audience for Kung Fu. To appeal in the states you need to mainstream it in such a way it doesn’t appeal to Asian markets.

My assumption is they’ll essentially create the franchise and up the mystical elements by huge amounts rather than using what little they can get from the comics. It just feels like a PR move of a movie.


#7785

Master of Kung Fu was actually much more spy orientated and as a kid it felt more like Bond than anything Bruce Lee did. The art and styling was often fantastic and if they took that and pushed the spy elements of Black Panther - having it set in China with Wakandan style tech advancement- I think it could be amazing and cross over to the Bond/Kingsman lovers as well as have a return to less CG action and fight scenes.


#7786

Remember, Bruce Lee was passed over for the roll of Kwai Chang Caine. A lot of the personnel at Marvel from that time are pretty open to talk about their aims for different books.

The character was conceived in late 1972. Marvel had wished to acquire the rights to adapt the Kung Fu television program, but were denied permission by the show’s owner, Warner Communications (now WarnerMedia), owner of DC Comics. Marvel acquired the comic book rights to Sax Rohmer’s pulp villain Dr. Fu Manchu instead.[1] They developed Shang-Chi, a master of kung fu, who was introduced as a previously unknown son of Fu Manchu.[2][3] Though an original character himself, many of Shang-Chi’s supporting characters (most notably Fu Manchu and Sir Denis Nayland Smith) were Rohmer creations. No characters from the Kung Fu television series carried over into the comic series, though the character Lu Sung, in an early issue, bears a strong resemblance to Kwai Chang Caine with the addition of a moustache.[4] With Paul Gulacy, his visual appearance was modeled after that of Bruce Lee.[5]


#7787

The same way Jackie Chan, JCVD and Chuck Norris made careers out of martial arts movies.


#7788

Oh I’m not saying Bruce Lee or Bruce Lee fills of the popularity of Kung Fu didn’t influence the book heavily, I’m just saying it became much more than a Bruce Lee pastiche and had a lot more to it because it had a lot more influences also injected into it.


#7789

Sub $300 million box office? Disney aren’t wasting a slot on their calendar for that kind of low level bush league shit. If it’s not $600 million they’re not wasting their time.


#7790

Well, you say Bruce Lee pastiche, but did you know there was a comic published in Hong Kong which claimed he faked his death and became a James Bond-style superspy? It ran for decades.