millarworld.tv Comics Creators

Marvel Comics: The CB Cebulski Generation Is Upon Us!

#5624

My guess is new comics are the primary revenue stream for virtually no remaining comic books stores.

That doesn’t mean they could survive without a Wednesday supply, of course.

1 Like
#5625

My local says new comics keep the lights on and back issues make a profit for him.

2 Likes
#5626

I think the Cebulski era is actually a step down. People were at least talking about the comic stories then.

2 Likes
#5627

The name is just an imprint. That’s easy. Just think about imprints like Dell and Gold Key that have long been just a licensing imprint for their old characters.

1 Like
#5628

Comic characters and culture is so massive now if you can’t make money without selling new comics you should get the fuck out of the business. There’s endless merchandise, endless trades, endless online promotion, every entertainment company pushing these characters.

Honestly I think stores would be better served to not continually invest in a product with unpredictable demand and a 4 week shelf life.

4 Likes
#5629

I don’t know enough about the industry to know what an e-in-c does, but I see the difference being that marvel under Alonso had some terrific, albeit low-selling, titles. It was their best creative period since the Jemas/Quesada era.

It could be that neither e-in-c has control over the relaunches, events etc…

#5630

I think that was probably Alonso’s downfall too though. He came from Vertigo and as an editor at Marvel he did best at rather odder creator led stuff like X-Statics. He never seemed to have the mainstream stuff figured out too well.

From what I’ve heard in Word Balloon chats with Quesada it does seem a large part of the title launches etc is out of their control. He said when Marvel films came out he was instructed to launch 8 Thor books, it was just down to him what the content would be.

3 Likes
#5631

Meanwhile, this is both annoying and a bit depressing — this is an excellent title that deserved a longer run.

(Edited to fix link)

2 Likes
#5632

I certainly enjoyed it.
More for the character interpersonal relationships than the actual plot.

What probably let it down…
The “Brodok” arc was unnecessary and dragged out.
The stakes were too silly .
I could of done without Kate’s new boyfriend ”Absorbing Man Light”

It probably needed one or 2 more big fan fav characters to survive .

1 Like
#5633

People have been saying this for nearly 30 years

It won’t die

It might shrink, it won’t die.

There’s far too many comics on the shelves at the moment, which dilutes the attention and sales on any given book or group of books.

The market needs to shrink and it will

Sorry for all the budding writers and artists out there, but the industry isn’t big enough for them all and 90% of them will be having to find new careers when they realise their big hope image book isn’t going to be made into a movie and turn them into a millionaire overnight

There’s never been so many people making comics and it’s not sustainable

3 Likes
#5634

I’m not so certain. I’d agree the Direct Market model is overloaded, with most of the pressure heaped on the shop owners who seem to get little to zero support from the comics company that rely on them to sell their product.

But is the Direct Market and 22-page per month issues the only viable format? Anthology titles sell poorly in the US market but that’s not the pattern elsewhere. Similarly, we don’t have reliable book sales data but there’s been cases of books becoming popular via that route.

So, yeah, some shrinkage is inevitable, I’m not sure if the local comic shop will survive and thinking you’re going to make millions from comics is a fool’s idea, but there might be capacity we’re not seeing, or perhaps better put, not able to see.

3 Likes
#5635

The market was way bigger in the 90s, but spread out better. The number of publishers and titles is probably unsustainable for the size of the Direct Market now, but there were definitely more titles being published per month before the bust.

1 Like
#5636

It does feel like they are reaching a crisis point, but they’ve done that many times before. It feels like Marvel Comics has already almost gone out of business a couple of times now and then done something crazy to pull out of it.

However, it might just be easier to stop or severely limit directly publishing and producing the comics, close down the shared universe and simply sell licenses for other companies to to put out comics with their characters. Maybe even seeing if any Manga publishers would be interested.

Then Marvel could simply focus on comics that make a profit - which may be the comics they license from other companies like Star Wars.

Is anyone making comics set in the new Godzilla/Kong movie “monster verse”?

#5637

IDW makes Godzilla comics although I don’t know if it’s in that universe.

#5638

A problem with licensing comics out to everyone is they would be perceived as an inferior product as it’s not Marvel proper producing them. It’ll be interesting to how the deal with IDW works out.

I’m not sure the direct market could survive without the institution that is Marvel. I think the DM would rapidly collapse and you’d see hundreds of stores close in a matter of months.

I think if Disney shuttered Marvel Comics, their stocks would take an immediate hit though I think long term, they would recover.

1 Like
#5639

But imagine all the money they’d save! The bottom line effect would be interesting. If Marvel comics is still making a profit, then of course, there is no reason to consider closing or changing UNLESS there is a strong likelihood of losing money in the long term. Better to start the process early than dealing with the money sink of a collapse of the business.

Unless they licensed them to the creative teams who form their own companies. A kind of radical version of Image comics. That would be something interesting.

1 Like
#5640

I know people are probably going to knock Conan being integrated into Marvel, but god damn do I think it’s cool.

There’s a goddamned picture of Wolverine looking annoyed because Conan’s sword is stuck in his skull. How awesome is that?

Stand by for the movie…

#5641

Leaving Home

When I was a boy I dreamt to one day become a Marvel artist. I grew up reading Avengers, Captain America, Spider-Man and, since my father was already an artist in Brazil, I decided I would do the same, but drawing the heroes that made my childhood so great.

I succeeded.

And I’ve been living my dream with those characters for 24 years!

I’ve loved every second of it.

Now I’m 56 and I have a new dream: to be a creator-owned artist. I wanna dedicate my full time to create my own books and characters.

Like everything in adult life, all decisions we make come with consequences, a price to be paid. In this case, in order to live my adult dream I have to let go my child dream. I have to leave Marvel. To leave home.

Marvel became a family to me, I grew as an artist and as a person together with all the good people I have worked there. The best people. Always encouraging me, always treating me with respect and care. It is weird that I feel like a teenager leaving home to face the world when I am older than a lot of them, but that is how I feel.

And I will miss and treasure them.

I actually told them about my decision almost one year ago and I wish I could share with you how supportive they were. Brought me tears just like now, while I’m writing this to all the fans.

June 14 will be my last day at home, but you will keep seeing me for a while after that, because my family would not let me go without a gift and what they gave me was the most amazing book ever, an opportunity for me to revisit all the characters I care the most in Marvel Universe - The Savage Avengers. I couldn’t think of a better farewell gift.

Marvel, I love you and always will.

Thanks for everything.

Mike Deodato, Jr.

8 Likes
#5642

And another one gone…

At this rate maybe Disney would be best just calling quits with the comics division of marvel

1 Like
#5643

Mike Deodato Jr is a classy guy. I remember having a chat with him years ago (that actually grew out of some negative criticisms I made of his work - he was very kind and gracious about it), and it ended up leading to a full interview that was one of the most enjoyable I did. A really nice guy.

6 Likes