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Marvel Comics: The CB Cebulski Generation Begins!


#5063

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#5064

It is a surprise to be fair it’s taken 17 years for it to be officially admitted (since everyone guessed from around day one).


#5065

#5066

That article is a bit of a hatchet job, certainly written to sell a one sided narrative.


#5067

#5068

Marvel really has me scratching my head these days.


#5069

The Akira Yoshida revelation is turning out to be the most interesting part of the Cebulski era. He doesn’t seem to have any clear idea of what to do with the company beyond endless franchising.


#5070

It’s like a pre-teen on a sugar high is coming up with ideas.


#5071

Yes, but sadly: would anyone be talking about this without the Wolverine inclusion? It’d be nice to think that Loki’s inclusion would be enough to generate interest & sales, but the reality is that no, he wouldn’t be enough.


#5072

A lot of talk that has come out of Marvel over the years has made me feel like the tail sometimes wags the dog when it comes to this stuff - editorial often feel beholden to marketing and plan books to a large extent based on recommendations from marketing for what will sell.

Which of course makes sense - they’re running a business - but it sometimes feels like a bit more creative inspiration (or at least slightly more effective concealment of the nakedly commercial impulses) would be welcome.


#5073

This happens to all companies. It’s the Steve Jobs Product over Sales speech all over again.


#5074

Is that from the Bob Cringley interview with Jobs? That’s pretty seminal, especially as a point of comparison with things Jobs would say after he returned to Apple


#5075

Yes I have too. The biggest one was Joe Quesada just after he’d been promoted upwards talking about his time as EiC. When asked why so many Thor books came out at a certain time he was honest in saying marketing told them to deliver x number of titles and he just had to fill the creative teams. When Hickman was talking about changes he had to make to his FF run he mentioned discussion with the sales department and not his editor.

I still don’t see under Alonso or Cebulski much move from event and relaunch being the main forces behind the books.


#5076

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#5077

I think it’s highly likely that they are doing the old school venom strategy of doing limited series for wolverine instead of ongoing’s.
Increase the price and perceived collectability buy pumping out minis and try to make him Center of the universe


#5078

Watching the Stan tributes a realization hit me. Stan was never embarrassed by writing comics. Never embarrassed about the characters. Didn’t mock them, deconstruct them, make fun of them or dismiss them. He spoke about them with passion, he made Spidey poses at public events, he thought they were cool. All the great writers feel no need to mock anything about their work - Tolkien, JK, King, GRR. No self conscious hesitation.

No-one in Marvel leadership acts like that. Most creators don’t act like that either. It’s a gig, it’s not grown up work, it’s a paycheck or a means to an end. It’s a bit embarrassing.

Marvel can’t get out of this hole until someone in charge acts like working on these characters is the coolest job in the world.

And what’s frustrating is that all the movie actors are already there. Not one of them embarrassed by who they play. It spills into their private life and they embrace it completely. And that’s why Marvel movies are working.

Marvel comics needs Stans swagger back.


#5079


#5080

I get what you’re trying to say but this isn’t entirely true. He literally changed his name because he didn’t want to waste his birth name on comics and wanted to become a “real” writer. Over time, he embraced what he was, adopting it as a persona by even changing Stan Lee to his legal name, and elevated the form but that’s not how he started.

Marshaling his childhood ambition to be a writer, young Stanley Lieber made his comic-book debut with the text filler “Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge” in Captain America Comics #3 (cover-dated May 1941), using the pseudonym Stan Lee,[21] which years later he would adopt as his legal name.[22]Lee later explained in his autobiography and numerous other sources that because of the low social status of comic books, he was so embarrassed that he used a pen name so that nobody would associate his real name with comics when he some day wrote the Great American Novel.[23]

The second generation at Marvel are on odd bunch too. Most of them came in as fans but really don’t have any interest in comics from the time that they stepped out. It’s like to them they stopped publishing once they quit working.


#5081

It’s actually an oft quoted bit from Lee where he was initially embarrassed to admit he was a comics writer when meeting people. I think the other side to that is he did a lot of the work that means that’s no longer the case.


#5082

I hear when he was a kid he didn’t even play with Hulk toys!