millarworld.tv Comics Creators

Every comic fans dream.. the Jackpot..Aladdin's Cave ..Discovery of a stack of classic comics


#1

Ever since I’ve been collecting comics I’ve had a dream. To walk into a charity shop, junk store or antiques shop and find a pile of classic comic issues for sale at a ridiculous price. I live in Ireland so classic Marvel/ DC comics from the 60’s are impossible to find. I’ve never seen even one. Friend of mine was in an antique shop last week and spotted a display cabinet with 6 issues. She isn’t a comics fan so snapped a quick pic to send to me later. from the pic I can only identify 2: Tales of Suspense 76 from 1966 & Xmen #44 from 1963 which both appear to be in VF condition. I am beside myself with excitement. Maybe even more interesting though is the shop has TWO boxes filled with 60’s comics for just two Euro each. I’m heading tomorrow to investigate the rest and definitely pick up the X-Men 44 & Tales Of Suspense. Keep your fingers crossed for me. This could be a once in a lifetime find…


#2

Hmmm, where is this antique shop again? :slight_smile:


#3

That’s very cool. Be sure to report back what you find.


#4

This reminds me of…


#5

So what happened?

I used to enjoy going to flea markets, “antique” stores and old book stores looking for comics but they all seemed to be priced as if they were mint condition no matter how ratty… clearly the sellers were using online stores to price them.


#6

The boxes turned out to be a bust, but still managed to grab some great books, Fantastic 4 #47, Fantastic 4 #97, tales of Suspense 76 1st Appearance of Ultimo, SGT Fury & the Howling commandos #37, Strange Tales #144 First Appearance of Jasper Sitwell & Thor #208 so 4 silver age from 1966 & two Bronze Age from the early 70’s. £50 for the lot. Really happy. I’ll probably never find books like this again In Ireland.


#7

Fantastic find - congrats on the adventure.


#8

Great stuff!

Although I would have lied and said there were three copies of Amazing Fantasy #15, seven copies of Action Comics #1, three 'tec #27s and an entire longbox of Daredevil: The Target #2.


#9

Don’t even get me started…


#10

:wink:


#11

Ok, we won’t. :slight_smile:


#12

Al, could you please post your story or leave it. These coy postings really aren’t conductive of discussion.

I’d really have no idea how to go about uncovering a hidden stash of books. Bar the famous handful of books I’d have no idea what was a significant issue and what wasn’t.


#13

Ok then… 13 years ago on the MW forum I posted this very scenario and I said if it was a poor old lady who didn’t know what she was doing, would you buy them or tell her what they were really worth. I got so many mixed replies and it was fun. Basically it wasn’t so much finding it but what ethics you have if you were to take advantage of the ignorant lady or not.

I thought everyone knew it by now, that was why I was “coy”.


#14

True story.

When I was about 14 a guy came to my door with a huge black bin-bag of comics. He said I could have the lot for a fiver. I’ve no idea how many were in there but it filled a bin-bag. My dad shouted me down from my room to see him. He apparently lived nearby and had heard from a mutual pal that I was into comics. He wanted a tenner, but would take a fiver.

Anyway, I opened the bag and saw Avengers #2, early Ditko Spideys (first Kraven is all I remember) very early Fantastic Fours (single figs) and so on. There was some junk in there too, but almost everything seemed to be a classic comic. Bear in mind this was maybe 1984 or so and collectibility was a thing.

Now this may come as some surprise but one one my greatest weaknesses is that I’m unflappably honest. I think it’s growing up with Swan-era Superman and a church on my street corner. So I didn’t even hesitate and told him about the great comic stores that had opened up in Glasgow and gave him the addresses, saying he had (I was guessing) hundreds of pounds worth of stuff in here. The guy looked annoyed, like I was fobbing him off, but he agreed and left.

I popped into one of the shops on the Saturday and asked the owner if he had been in. The owner told me there were THOUSANDS of pounds worth of books in there and the guy had only asked for a fiver, but he gave him the tenner for the lot as a gesture of goodwill. My reward for the intro was a free copy of a Transformers comic with a Bill Sienkiewicz cover. I have no idea why that last bit stays with me or what the moral of this story is!

MM


#15

Superman would have taken the silly mans comics for a fiver, flogged the lot and split the profits. You should be ashamed Millar, for not helping that man out properly. St Peter will have a word when (if) you get to the pearly gates. :joy::joy:


#16

Wow. I probably would have bitten his hand off. :slight_smile:


#17

In hindsight I should have taken them in and asked for a cut :frowning:

MM


#18

I’m a great believer in Karma, you 100 percent did the right thing. This shop had them priced at their approximate value. If anything I over paid. Doesn’t matter to me this was about the find. The fact I could buy classic comics like this gave me a thrill I can barely describe. It must be what it feels like to be a junkie.


#19

I don’t think there is a right and wrong answer here. I also don’t think it’s ever wrong to go with what you feel is the right decision though.

A comic shop owner friend of mine was contact by an estate that was selling a rather sizable mostly Silver Age collection. There were some huge runs in this collection. My buddy paid them a fair price that would then allow him to resell them and make a profit. The problem is there was a ton of work involved in selling the lot. He ended up breaking close to even and probably in the hole if he included all of his time.

So in that scenario I would pay the man what I could. As long as both parties feel the deal is equitable, I think it is fair. If I was able to flog it for much more later, I might be inclined to give the other person a cut depending on how much work was involved and what the margin was.


#20

Great action Sir, you helped your neighboor