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Diversity in Modern Society


#1205

Yeah I know, but Amazon isn’t in the “water” business… However if Bezos spent his money on fixing roads, bridges and stuff that IS related to the transportation business he runs, that’d make more sense…


#1206

No worries. Like I said, it wasn’t even a serious suggestion or proposal, just a random thought experiment. I just think it does say something telling about the level of wealth disparity that so few people could have a direct impact on so many lives without a discernible impact on their own, and that we all recognize how implausible it is to think they would ever do so.


#1207

If the goal was to benefit Amazon in some way, sure. That’s not really how charity is usually thought of, though.


#1208

However, unlike the Baby College, they often don’t particular focus on changing specific cultural behavior. In the Baby College, they are telling parents not to tell their kids to shut up. Not to smack them when they talk back. Essentially, do not raise your children the way that you were raised. Teach them to get up on time and to have a good attitude at school and work.

That only works if it comes from inside the community from people who are a part of or are recognized to be a part of that community. A lot of the problems minorities face are detrimental behavior that will not go away even if the problems of policing and racism are addressed.


#1209

No, but it’s more realistic… I mean, you’ll have an easier time convincing a billionaire to spend money on fixing public stuff if it also happens to be a smart long-time investment (which it would be, btw). Anyways, I just thought it was funny & random to pick the water crisis in Flint among all the other areas that need fixing… no biggie…


#1210

The “specific cultural behaviors” you’re talking about aren’t remotely specific to certain cultures, and exist just as much in white communities, and if anything minority communities often place a greater value on appropriate behavior and the need for education.


#1211

If I had $20 billion I wouldn’t use it to cover for money the government should be spending. I’m already giving the government half my income.

I’d do something like what Bill Gates does.


#1212

#1213

Provide meditation rooms with foot baths for your workers? :wink:


#1214

That’s gross.


#1215

Yet you previously suggested that governments should pay for things instead of wealth hoarders like Bezos:

You’ll never hear disagreement from me that class is the biggest issue, and that wealth inequality is the biggest problem that governments in our countries need to address. I was surprised since you’re usually the one suggesting that class and wealth disparity doesn’t matter, and that everyone’s doing really well.


#1216

I think poverty is more a result than the cause. Obviously, there are a lot of external factors that are involved. Governments haven’t and still do not value the rights or conditions of minorities over the comfort of the mainstream. Minorities suffer greater municipal fines and citations than whites even at the same economic level. Some of this is a serious side effect of zero tolerance “broken tail light” policing policies, but also cities know that the poor blacks and hispanics in their jurisdictions are so politically leveraged and neutralized they can be exploited as a source of revenue with little or no ability to challenge that exploitation in civic process. Tax liens and imminent domain (gentrification) are also a source of income and property redistribution from the poor to the rich.

Also, cities and states (and both political parties) have formed cozy relationships with companies that profit from people in seriously leveraged financial positions. From payday lenders to rent-to-own stores all the way to for-profit prison companies. There is a strong industry whose profits come from taking all the money they can from those who don’t have much and/or whose profits depend on a continuation of the conditions that support and encourage poverty.

So, there is a lot that governments could be doing to simply get out of the way of poor minorities to help them pull themselves out of these conditions generationally, but they have no incentive to do so. Cities, states and local governments only have short term thinking - even the Federal government only works from election cycle to election cycle - while the problem of poverty takes generational concentration.

A large part of this is, again, simply racist - but much more of it, I think, is systemic.

However, these generations of continued hand-to-mouth living has led to some serious internal pressures sustaining poverty in neighborhoods and communities. As mentioned, blacks in America are overrepresented in child abuse statistics, drop out statistics, divorce rates, homelessness, unemployment, drug addiction and, obviously, prison populations. People born into those conditions then grow into those conditions and then bring up the next generation to sustain and live in - not overcome - those conditions. So, even if the external pressure is lessened, internal inertia will prevent improvement for a great number of the members of those communities.

So, it will look like whatever gets done under one administration was futile because the essential conditions show no sign of improvement. When, in fact, that would be an unrealistic expectation. Instead, removing external pressure or exploitation has to then be combined with support for internal community leadership, ownership and services that allow people who’ve never had the advantage to take advantage of the new opportunities.

However, since those seem to disappear as soon as the country stops paying attention, nobody has any incentive to expect to be able to rely on any continued change.


#1217

I don’t want to gross you out but… I don’t think that’s for feet :flushed:


#1218

#1219

Microsoft is taken over by Islam!


#1220

A lot of colleges have them as well. It’s generally an accommodation.


#1221

What the hell do they do with that contraption? :smile:

Seriously, I can’t work it out.


#1222

#1223

Fascinating! I didn’t know one could bathe at work. Silly me!

It does lead me to wonder. How does a religion that grew from a culture that’s rooted in a big hot arid desert climate come up with a ritual that requires that much water? I’m missing something here.


#1224

Pretty much every office I’ve ever worked in has had showers.