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Diversity in Modern Society


#3034

That’s what really annoys me about the whole ancient aliens theory, they frequently ignore older and more complex structures, but they’re not as well known.


#3035

I don’t even know what’s so mysterious about a ton of people lifting a ton of rocks… u_u


#3036

Update on that story:


#3037

A few years back, one of my many unfinished projects was an alternate history novel set at the time of Alexander in a world where the Persians had defeated and subjugated the Greeks. The first thing they did was to free the slaves, and with labor now at a high value, technology advanced to create labor saving devices kickstarting an extremely early, steam-powered industrial revolution.

The hero of the story was an Athenian engineer and inventor whose grandfather had been a slave freed by the Persians, but was now conflicted as he worked for Alexander who led a rebellion to overthrow the Persian Empire and would likely reinstate the practice of slavery.

Essentially, the central idea was that slavery and serfdom or its modern equivalents promoting exploitatively cheap labor tended to cause stasis and stagnation in cultures throughout history.


#3038

Interesting idea, but I’m not sure I agree (or disagree, for that matter) with it. It’s a bit more nuanced I think… but definetly an interesting idea/thought experiment kind of thing.


#3039

It is more complicated. The concept for the story was essentially to have a war with technology as complicated as the Victorian Era, but they didn’t have guns or bombs (though they did have Greek fire, of course) so still fought with hard forged spears, swords and factory-produced body armor.

Cheap slave labor was a big part of the advancement of capitalism and industry, but other than the cotton gin, the real advancement was in the areas where slavery was outlawed. The slaves produced the raw goods, but they were milled in the North. Then the profits were poured into improving the mills and factories while the South remained culturally static.

In Greece, there was a lot of advancement of thought, but only in Athens among the upper class. Most of the other Greek states were too concerned with maintaining control over their slaves and subjugated neighbors. The Spartans only sent 300 against Persia because they were afraid of a Helot rebellion back home if they didn’t keep most of their army there. Obviously, there were plenty of Greek slaves and vassals who would want the Persians to win.

Ironically, in Egypt, the Pyramids and buildings used no slave labor. These were experienced and skilled mostly Egyptian professionals who would actually go on strike if they were not paid on time.


#3040

The inner circle of Stonehenge is made of bluestones, those rocks are only found in the Preseli mountains in west Wales, around 200 miles away from the Salisbury area if you avoid the wide Bristol Channel (which now has two bridges over it to cross easily). They did try and recreate the movement of one of the stones a few years back without using technology unavailable at the time, it sunk when they tried to cross a river. There are theories glaciers transported the rocks but there are issues there that no other traces can be found anywhere else outside Preseli, it’s a little convenient they’d have used up every one.

I don’t think you need to look at alien theories but there’s some genuine mystery there, as with the Pyramids, as to how they managed it above just ‘popping up a few rocks’.

Yup there are a few almost identical to Newgrange, the best examples found in Orkney in Scotland and Anglesey in Wales. The most interesting aspect there is not so much the physical construction but how they tell us of a shared culture between pretty remote areas.


#3041

#3042

#3043

Don’t want to see racism? I love seeing racism!

(I had to say that, sorry…)


#3044

What a shit article.


#3045

I took a look at the authors other articles and honestly he’s clearly a messed up angry person playing a character to gee up racial division. There’s no place for that kind of content here, so let’s just leave him to whatever trash website decided to pay him a salary for being an ignorant hateful piece of shit and try to keep the bar raised in threads like this. Or we’ll just no longer have threads like this. I’m cool with that option too.


#3046

He’s a columnist, like Piers Morgan, Jeremy Clarkson and Katie Hopkins. Although not so much in her case these days.


#3047

Besides, it’s not about racism… it’s about social media.

That’s just the way horror movies and novels (from which this movie was adapted) work, though. The subconscious of the viewer latches on to the monster and fills it with real fears (very apt, considering the nature of the threat in Bird Box). So, some might see ignorance of racism and other the dangers of social media while, in truth, most of the time we don’t really know what it is in us that is scared by these stories in their various media.

If we really did know, it wouldn’t be as scary.


#3048

#3049

#3050

Oh, that’s hilarious. Waitasec- July 2017 !?


#3051

I first realised this localised effect about 20 years ago when I got to know a “Canadian of Asian Origin” and was firmly informed that “Oriental” was considered derogatory. To me, it was purely descriptive, a geographic term, and I’d never heard anyone using it in a derogatory fashion.

It was further complicated by her telling me she was Asian, and I was like, no, you’re visibly not from India or Pakistan :confused:


#3052

You could have told him that you’re a Kabbalist, and the vegetative state of being is an essential part of your religious teaching, and you wish people wouldn’t offend your religion by using the term for people with impaired brain functions.

Now there’s a conundrum.


#3053

Can’t imagine how that conversation could have gone wrong.