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Diversity in Modern Society


#2911

Here’s a pretty well researched article on the effects of soy on males. It’s not so much impacting testosterone levels as it is impacting cortisol and negatively effecting recovery.


#2912

It is my understanding that in that specific instance, “pussy” has nothing to do with vaginas or associations with women.

It is a shortened form of pusillanimous, which means “lacking courage”.


#2913

And I’m not even joking… I actually didn’t know that word… :smile:


#2914

Absolutely. With the huge wave of narcissism (and I’m talking the psychodiagnostic kind, not just the being-an-asshat kind) being epidemic the social therapy that has to be applied is a correction to language. One aspect of narcissistic personality disorder is when it can also be associated with some sort of problem in the anal stage (which almost always happens). Those who become anal-retentive tend to become bankers or homeowner’s association presidents. Some role to annoy others by being far too picky. The other lot, far more common, is anal-expulsive. These folks are constant verbal diarrhea, anything coming out of their mouths is negative, attacks others, demeaning, self-referential, down-putting, and typically encompasses a much, much smaller base of actual knowledge than can be expected.

How do we fix this? We must take people at their word. Not legalisms, not slang that can be shaded as desired to fit the disorder, but by honest straightforward speech. We start on a national level by curbing advertising by parsing the content. Misleading or flat-out lying ads must not be run anywhere. Second, we hold public figures to their word. Lying means ostracization. Booting out. Sending to Coventry. The worse the insult to fact, the longer the ouster.

Lying is bad. Constant verbal abuse? Hideous, and introverts are particularly vulnerable. Cussing? Definitely needs to be reduced by about 99%, and I’m more foulmouthed than expected. (Especially when agitated, but at lease i can be colorful and descriptive.) Roomie had a lot of trouble on his last job, but one big issue was the toxic work environment in construction. (Plus he was working with shady characters who hired from the bottom of the barrel, so the intellectual level was absent.) These guys talked so badly (sexual violence, mostly) that even he (with his own problems) could not take it and complained to the boss. This is from someone with the exact narcissistic symptoms described above, but with about a year with ol’ Miqque working with him to change that nonsense. It’s still a long road, but he’s chugging along.

My thoughts on this issue are complex and actually quite academic. I could lecture on it for a full semester while using a couple / three books I’d have to write. It all ties together neatly, but one does have to be clever with a wide knowledge base to follow. (I consider most of you good MWers in that category.)

And, of course, society is shaped by language (and vice versa). Ask the Etruscans.


#2915

And now you do. Missed Spiro Agnew and his “pusillanimous pussyfooters”, did you?


#2916

I don’t even know what a Spiro Agnew is… though the name rings a bell… is that like a Tin Tin? :smile:

(yeah I know he’s a vice president after a quick google, but damned if that’s not one of the most cartoony names ever).


#2917

You should have seen the dude. Big, overbearing pompous fellow all full of himself and his vocabulary. It was just fancy verbal diarrhea, as he was one of the crookedest of Nixon’s crooks.


#2918

I always thought it was derived from “scaredy cat” - and I would have assumed it predated the sexual term by a long way. I’m not looking up the etymology at work.

There are non-gendered, non sexual terms that convey the same meaning - wimp, wuss, baby, yellow/“yeller”/yellow-bellied.


#2919

Not when I’m driving behind someone who obviously bought his driver’s license on e-Bay.


#2920

Well your sense is fucking wrong, Ben.

(Although, I would say it’s seen as lower-class and perhaps frowned upon for that reason, even though everyone does it. It’s practically every other word where I live.)


#2921

I don’t really use the word “pussies” anymore, although I used to use the word a lot, particularly when watching sports. Even though it’s not an official swear, I don’t use “retard” anymore, and I guess for the same reason. When you grow up in New England, where everyone grew up calling each other “fuckin’ retahded,” that one was hard to ditch, but at some point it just felt lame and bad to say it aloud. Maybe it was around when I started having kids, but I just felt like a piece of shit when I said it so I stopped. “Pussy” is the same way.

It is true that a lot of these of words and phrases don’t necessarily mean anything anymore. When my kid asked me what “fuck” means, I said it doesn’t mean anything really, which is true. It means something when I say “I’d like to fuck Mary Poppins,” sure, but it doesn’t mean anything when I say “what the fuck is Marvel doing with all of these fucking relaunches.” So it is silly. But there also words that too easily call broader and more unkind connotations to mind.


#2922

I always used the dedicated swears - fuck, shit and cunt. No need to to call someone a pussy when it’s more satisfying to call someone a fucking idiot.

Since the kids I don’t swear hardly at all. A long way from the Irish tradition of swearing as a speech hesitation.


#2923

Including the President.

I was never much of a swearer; adopted some as a 17-18 year old, and then dialled it way back ever since. I’d say most people have only ever heard me swear if I’m quoting someone.

Most of my swearing takes place when I’m alone in the car.


#2924

Nothing in movies is depicted as normal, though. The inadvertent and inconsequential assumptions in movies stories provide a greater inclination of the Times than the actions of the characters. You have to remember that the “rapists” in those movies were portrayed by actors who were adored by the women in their audiences. The forced seduction and forceful passes were made by impossibly handsome men on unimaginably alluring women. It wasn’t “normal”. It was escape from normal - a dramatic exaggeration of emotions that the people watching never expected to see or do in real life.

It wasn’t wrong and what we see in entertainment today is not any “better.” Ironically, as aggressive sex is eliminated as too controversial, entertainment has just gotten more murderous and bloody.


#2925

Also “cunt” does not have anything to do with the female reproductive organ, it is originally derived from cuntasaurus, who was the least pleasant dinosaur of all.


#2926

There is a ton of media theory that would disagree with you (Stuart Hall, bell hooks, Laura Mulvey, Henry Jenkins, Frederic Jameson, Horkheimer and Adorno, etc.). Even leaving that aside, I’m not sure how the attractiveness of the actors, or their popularity, impacts the actions the characters the audience is meant to experience the story through affects whether or not it normalizes certain behavior and both reflects and influences culture.

And the idea that “impossibly handsome men” accounts for two of the biggest examples from the 80s - Anthony Michael Hall’s Farmer Ted or Robert Carradine’s Lewis doesn’t really hold up.

Also, there are measurably fewer depictions of socially acceptable sexual assault in films and on TV now than there was then, which is part of what makes those things stand out when we look back, and that’s likely in large part due to an increase in real world conversations and actions taken regarding date rape, sexual harassment, spousal rape (which wasn’t even illegal in the United States until the 1990s), which is because of the relationship between the real world and the cultural works we produce and consume.


#2927

Supposedly, word “cunt” in US, means just as horrible, compared to UK. And when I am watching British movies, some deliberately use the word.


#2928

The C word is a major no-no in the UK. Even hardened criminals won’t use it.

Of course in Ireland it’s a word of endearment. Caused me much confusion when I first moved to the US.


#2929

I thought that was the US? Where it’s seemingly exclusively gendered; used only for/at women. DeNiro’s Sam Rothstein utters it in Casino, at Sharon Stone’s Ginger; I can’t think of many other instances of it in US film. The UK music press doesn’t seem to shy from including it (I’ve read many Liam and Noel Gallagher interviews), and it’s included in a John Lennon out-take (aimed at McCartney), and the lyrics to the Libertines first single (charted at #37 in 2002).

Here it’s not really allowed on TV and probably remains the worst (non-racial) word; but down a pub you’d probably hear blokes referring to each other, or work colleagues by it.


#2930

Yeah should be the US. Autocorrect error.