millarworld.tv Comics Creators

Careers in Film and Other

That’s a lot to cover for a career in Starbucks.

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It’s almost like there are people who don’t exclusively prioritize making money over everything else.

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So long as every student understands that going in.

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Given that most of them are adults, they do. They’re old enough to vote, serve in the military, etc. Aside from that, it’s an elective and a survey class, so the entire purpose of that type of class is to expand a students education beyond simply career training.

And I truly don’t mean this as any sort of shot, but it’s truly odd to me that someone so close to a comic writer who has achieved the level of success Millar has is so dismissive about someone pursuing a career related to the arts. I mean, sure, there are plenty of economically safer goals, but most of the people I’ve encountered, from students to peers, are well aware of the realities of their field.

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Millar didn’t need college to write. He just wrote.

Not that I really want to bash arts - lots of people have careers in arts. But it think artists create and that’s the learning process. If this is an elective then it’s a bunch of money to study something you’ll never use. Time and money are critical when you’re young. We’d be kidding ourselves if we didn’t admit there’s a ton of young people saddled with crippling debt and educations that can’t get them work, and I blame the colleges for that, marketing classes that they know aren’t relevant to 99% of careers.

College should be for job preparation. If it were free than who cares, but it’s not. It’s pretty much the most important investment anyone makes in their entire lives.

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On the other hand, it could be argued that being cultured in the arts is important to being a well rounded individual. You never know what might help you get ahead in work. Being able to hold in-depth conversation in a variety of subjects comes in handy. There’s nothing wrong with learning about film in school. And learning to deconstruct a story and analyze it is a critical skill. Storytelling matters in more than just the arts. As does critical analysis.

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Having been someone who went though both journalistic media and creative media studies in higher education (which I didn’t finish because I am, and have always been, an asshole of a student and have issues with being taught things by teachers) I think that while you get taught how filmmaking works or how stories should be told or reported correctly, there should be a strong emphasis on practical ladder climbing for your career rather than so much theory. However, everything I learnt stayed with me and everything I knew beforehand was reinforced, so it’s always given me a lot of confidence.

Probably too much confidence though as I am a narcissistic, perfectionist, control freak who has, on numerous occasions, pissed their talent up a gable wall while thinking romantically about how beautiful a pattern my golden spray leaves behind as I give zero fucks.

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I’d say if you want to have a career in film then going to film school is extremely valuable, not necessarily for what you learn (although that helps) but who you meet.

It might be less important now than it was back when it was by far the easiest way for a 20-year-old to get their hands on actual cameras, film development, lights, editing equipment, etc., but it is still helpful.

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Resume building, interviewing, and networking should all be required college courses. Maybe even required high school courses. Those are probably the most important skills you can have for most careers.

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I think the big problem here is that anything in the creative arts sector has the constantly perpetuated myth that someone is going to see your talent and reach down like a arcade stuffed toy crane, pick you up from obsecurity and make you a star when in reality talent and knowledge of how that field works in creative theory is only a small part of how much you have to make concessions, mostly always in how you behave to those above you in the food chain to get in a position where you’re doing anything of worth.

That sounds pessimistic but creative vocations just get clique-y in a way where talent often comes secondary and I think its important to know the realities of that. I doubt it’s going to be part of any syllabus. To be fair I do remember that art education began veering much more to graphic design because at least there was work there that you could build a cv for, where as if anyone had aspirations of being the next Basquiat you’re shit out of luck unless you know which dicks to fellate or simply don’t look or act the part.

Filmmaking is probably the least dick suckery creative field because there are just so many jobs that need doing and it’s such a large technical industry, so there are a million paths to get you to directing a movie, but I still think students still need to know that their creative genius doesn’t necessarily matter when people are spending big wads of cash to make practically anything put on film professionally.

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It’s not like you don’t get exposure to the arts all thru high school. It’s not like our entire free time isn’t spent enjoying the arts. It’s not like we each ourselves can’t persue our own interest in art. Every time we have this conversation we somehow pretend the suggestion is to shut every library and only learn about car engines.

College is the biggest investment you’ll make. I’d you don’t make it about your career you’re going to fuck your self.

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College (in my experience as a student) is equal parts teaching (in terms of content) and mentoring (in terms of the necessities of finding a career within your field of study, regardless of what that is). And, just to clarify, something like a degree in film could be either on the artistic/production side or on the theory/criticism side, with teaching as a pathway for the latter.

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Has anyone seen the Box Office thread? It was around here somewhere…

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It was a flop. Horrible opening weekend.

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I was a film major for a year. The program I was in had some prestige due to being one of the few in the US to offer an MFA but mostly produced documentary and experimental film makers or people who worked on the technical side of Hollywood.

A lot of that had to do with the DIY nature of the program. In my first film class, we were actually filming and cutting from Super 8 film when there was only one developer in the US and most programs had starting going digital. That was because at the time Hollywood still filmed and cut on 32 mm film and it was a necessary skill. We had to learn lighting, color temperature, sound editing, script writing and editing and various other things that go into making a film. Part of that was learning film language and how a film goes together which film theory classes helped with.

One of the big advantages of the program was there was an internship program that placed students in Hollywood on productions usually as Production Assistants. That helped with the networking aspect of the job.

To be fair, actual film making is a lot of problem solving. A lot of aspects of the job aren’t that different than what I do as an engineer.

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I glad to hear that your experience college wise is much stronger on the mentoring side than what I’ve seen and heard in my experience. That’s a difficult task in general because you have to both undercut someone’s dreams and keep them intact at the same time, but I think it’s incredibly important for people to have a realistic view of how their hobby loses oomf when it becomes a job and you have to rely on you as a person interacting within that creative field for more and better opportunities rather than talent or knowledge but also that with hard work and passion they can bring that oomf back because that will also lead to better opportunities in the long run.

I also think, and I can’t stress this enough, location is a massive factor in the creative arts. It’s shouldn’t be, especially not with the internet, but it is. The geography of a chosen field is important to learn too, I think.

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To go on a tangent, Glass has made 5x its base budget worldwide.

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But where did M. Night Shyamalan go to film school? :wink:

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That’s awesome. I missed out on proper film cutting, my first editing was though video - I wish I could remember the name of the hardware device offhand, but it was a very rudimentary analogue controller.

I definitely agree with the problem solving aspect. You have to have strong background knowledge or experience to solve new problems that arise (or just be very good at that)… there’s a term for it I can’t think of offhand, but basically you have to McGyver a lot of situations. Finding workable solutions through what you already know or a leap of thought. I can see how engineering would be similar in that respect.

However, for me at least, I’m a little more in awe of engineering than I am of filmmaking.

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The twist is it doesn’t matter because his parents paid for his first few films to be made. True story.

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